Ubuntu06 Feb 2019 10:11 am

The other day gnumeric crashed on me and like a good Ubuntu user, I submitted the crash report to the Ubuntu Error Tracker. Naturally, I also wanted to see the crash report in the Error Tracker and find out if other people had experienced the crash. It used to be an ordeal to find the OOPS ID associated with a specific crash, you’d have to read multiple lines of the systemd journal using ‘journalctl -u whoopsie.service’ and find the right OOPS ID for the crash about which you are interested.

$ journalctl -u whoopsie.service
-- Logs begin at Fri 2019-02-01 09:36:47 PST, end at Wed 2019-02-06 08:41:02 PST. --
Feb 02 07:08:46 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:08:46] Parsing /var/crash/_usr_bin_gnumeric.1000.crash.
Feb 02 07:08:46 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:08:46] Uploading /var/crash/_usr_bin_gnumeric.1000.crash.
Feb 02 07:08:48 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:08:48] Sent; server replied with: No error
Feb 02 07:08:48 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:08:48] Response code: 200
Feb 02 07:08:48 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:08:48] Reported OOPS ID 7120987c-26fc-11e9-9efd-fa163ee63de6
Feb 02 07:11:11 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:11:11] Sent; server replied with: No error
Feb 02 07:11:11 impulse whoopsie[4358]: [07:11:11] Response code: 200

However, I recently made a change to whoopsie to write the OOPS ID to the corresponding .uploaded file in /var/crash. So now I can just read the .uploaded file to find the OOPS ID.


$ sudo cat /var/crash/_usr_bin_gnumeric.1000.uploaded
7120987c-26fc-11e9-9efd-fa163ee63de6

This is currently only available in Disco Dingo, which will become the 19.04 release of Ubuntu, but if you are interested in having it in another release let me know or update the bug.

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