July 2017


Ubuntu19 Jul 2017 02:52 pm

I’ve recently made some changes to how do-release-upgrade, called by update-manager when you choose to upgrade releases, behaves and thought it’d be a good time to clarify how things work and the changes made.

When do-release-upgrade is called it reads a meta-release file from changelogs.ubuntu.com to determine what releases are supported and to which release to upgrade. The exact meta-release file changes depending on what arguments, –proposed or –devel-release, are passed to do-release-upgrade. The meta-release file is used to determine which tarball to download and use to actually perform the upgrade. So if you are upgrading from Ubuntu 17.04 to Artful then you are actually using the the ubuntu-release-upgrader code from Artful.

One change implemented some time ago was support for the release upgrade process to skip unsupported releases if you are running a supported release. For example, when Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) becomes end of life and you upgrade from Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) with “Prompt=normal” (found in /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades) then Ubuntu 16.10 will be skipped and you will be upgraded to Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus). This ensures that you are running a supported release and helps to test the next LTS upgrade path i.e. from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04. Similarly, when Ubuntu 17.04 becomes end of life an upgrade from Ubuntu 16.04, with “Prompt=normal”, will upgrade you to Ubuntu 17.10.

I’ve also just modified the documentation regarding the ‘-d’ switch for ubuntu-release-upgrader and update-manager to make it clear that ‘-d’ is from upgrading from the latest supported release (Ubuntu 17.04 right now) to the development release of Ubuntu. The documentation used to incorrectly imply that any release could be updated to the development release, something that would be an unsafe upgrade path. Additionally, the meta-release-development and meta-release-lts-development files were modified to only contain information about releases relevant to the upgrade path. So meta-release-lts-development is currently empty and meta-release-development only contains information about Ubuntu 17.04 and Artful Aadrvark which will become Ubuntu 17.10.

I hope this makes things a bit clearer!

Ubuntu12 Jul 2017 10:48 am

The Ubuntu Error Tracker is really good at presenting information about the versions of packages affected by a crash. Additionally, it has current information about crashes regarding stable releases of Ubuntu in addition to the development release. Subsequently, it can be a great resource for verifying that a crash is fixed for the development release or for stable releases.

As a member of the Stable Release Updates team I am excited to see an SRU which includes a bug report either generated from a crash in the Ubuntu Error Tracker (identifiable by either the bug description or errors.ubuntu.com being in the list of subscribers) or with a link to a crash in the Ubuntu Error Tracker.

One example of this is a systemd-resolved crash which while the bug report was not created by the bug bridge does contain a link to a bucket in the Error Tracer. Using the bucket in the Error Tracker we were able to confirm that new version of the package did not appear there and subsequently was no longer experiencing the same crash.

Two crashes about libgweather, bug 1688208 and bug 1695567, are less perfect examples because libgweather ended up causing gnome-shell to crash and the Error Tracker buckets for these crashes only show the version of gnome-shell. But fortunately apport gathers information about the package’s (gnome-shell in this case) dependencies and as the maintainer of the Error Tracker I can query its database. Using that ability I was able to confirm, by querying individual instances in the bucket, that the new version of libgweather did in fact fix both crashes.

So whether you are fixing crashes in the development release of Ubuntu or a stable release keep in mind that its possible to use the Error Tracker to verify that your fix works.